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NMR Imaging and Localized Spectroscopy

Kamil Ugurbil, Ph.D.
P41EB015894
Active

Center Overview

The Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) focuses on development of unique magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy methodologies and instrumentation for the acquisition of structural, functional, and biochemical information non-invasively in humans, and utilizing this capability to investigate organ function in health and disease.

The distinctive feature of this resource is the emphasis on ultrahigh magnetic fields (7 Tesla and above), which was pioneered by this BTRC. This emphasis is based on the premise that there exists significant advantages to extracting biomedical information using ultrahigh magnetic fields, provided difficulties encountered by working at high frequencies corresponding to such high field strengths can be overcome by methodological and engineering solutions.

This BTRC is home to some of the most advanced MR instrumentation in the world, complemented by human resources that provide unique expertise in imaging physics, engineering, and signal processing. No single group of scientists can successfully carry out all aspects of this type of interdisciplinary biomedical research; by bringing together these multi-disciplinary capabilities in a synergistic fashion, facilitating these interdisciplinary interactions, and providing adequate and centralized support for them under a central umbrella, this BTRC amplifies the contributions of each of these groups of scientists to basic and clinical biomedical research.

Collectively, the approaches and instrumentation developed in this BTRC constitute some of the most important tools used today to study system level organ function and physiology in humans for basic and translational research, and are increasingly applied world-wide.

Impact on Human Health

Since its discovery, Magnetic Resonance Imaging has rapidly become an indispensable and critical technology employed in health care, improving diagnosis and patient management dramatically. Today, numerous pathologies in a multitude of organ systems rely on an MRI exam for detection. Initially, MRI was developed to provide structural images of human anatomy, as in X-ray. However, unlike X-rays, MRI has proven to be an extremely versatile and dynamic technology; it has rapidly evolved to include methods that generate images of organ function (most notably brain function), blood flow, perfusion, neuronal connectivity, biochemistry etc. in humans, and has enabled visualization of aspects of disease processes before the onset of structural changes that would be detectable in an anatomical MRI or X-ray. Despite this impressive history, MR technology is far from being mature. New developments continue unabated adding incessantly to the armamentarium of methods we have to diagnose and monitor the presence of disease. The NCRR supported research in CMRR has and continues to play a critical role in this effort.

Advanced MR technologies, such as those pioneered by CMRR, are becoming indispensable in basic and translational research in humans in health and disease. Clearly, research into new therapies, including new pharmaceuticals, is one important and obvious area how human health can be impacted. However, such efforts require a foundation of basic knowledge on cellular and organ level processes that sustain normal function and perturbations that occur during diseased states. Such basic knowledge is gained slowly and painstakingly through research at various levels of complexity ranging from studies with isolated molecules, cells in culture, perfused organs, animal models and ultimately, and most importantly, humans. With respect to the human studies, capabilities provided by advanced MRI methods and instrumentation are indispensable if we are to generate knowledge hat can ultimately be translated in better human health.

Resources

ResourceDescriptionSupported PlatformsSupported FormatsData TypeData Size (compressed)
Cluster probability
NMR Imaging and Localized Spectroscopy
NIBIB

This program is a direct implementation of the following paper: Jinhu Xiong, et al. "Clustered Pixels Analysis for Functional MRI Activation Studies of the Human Brain" Human Brain Mapping, 3:287-301(1995).

Unix N/A N/A
FASTMAP
NMR Imaging and Localized Spectroscopy
NIBIB

FASTMAP is a shimming technique based on measuring B0 field plots along projections instead of mapping whole imaging planes with the benefit of improved speed and performance.

Varian FID N/A N/A
MTM
NMR Imaging and Localized Spectroscopy
NIBIB

Multi-Taper Methods for signal/noise analysis described in P. Mitra and B. Pesaran,
"Analysis of Dynamic Brain Imaging Data" Biophys.J.1999 76:691-708

Varian FID N/A N/A
Multi-band EPI
NMR Imaging and Localized Spectroscopy
NIBIB

Highly-accelerated 2D EPI pulse sequence for Siemens scanners.  Sequences developed at CMRR are available for use at other institutions on compatible Siemens scanners by C2P agreement with CMRR and Siemens.

Linux Siemens VD11Ds N/A N/A
NMR Kitchen
NMR Imaging and Localized Spectroscopy
NIBIB

NMRKITCHEN is a user-friendly program for simulating spin-system evolution during pulse sequences.

Windows N/A N/A
PhysioFix for Matlab
NMR Imaging and Localized Spectroscopy
NIBIB

PhysioFix is an implementation of the following paper for single-shot EPI fMRI: X. Hu, T. H. Le, T. Parrish and P. Erhard “Retrospective Estimation and Correction of Physiological Fluctuation in fMRI”  Magn. Reson. Med., 34:201-212 (1995)

Linux, Mac OSX, Windows Matlab, Varian FID N/A N/A
PhysioFix User's Guide
NMR Imaging and Localized Spectroscopy
NIBIB

PhysioFix is an implementation of the following paper for single-shot EPI fMRI: X. Hu, T. H. Le, T. Parrish and P. Erhard “Retrospective Estimation and Correction of Physiological Fluctuation in fMRI”  Magn. Reson. Med., 34:201-212(1995)

Linux, Mac OSX, Windows Matlab, Varian FID N/A N/A
RELMODEL
NMR Imaging and Localized Spectroscopy
NIBIB

RELMODEL is a user- friendly program for calculation the relaxation parameters T1, T2 and correlation and spectral density functions from the molecular motion correlation times and restriction parameters.

Windows N/A N/A
Sarcalc
NMR Imaging and Localized Spectroscopy
NIBIB

The SAR calculator (SARcalc) is a header file designed to let you see how much power is actually produced by your sequence.  It can be useful for quick calculations before a study so you do not waste time resetting should the RF monitor trip. You can quickly see how much energy is present, and how long you should make the TR period to minimize heating.

Varian FID N/A N/A
Stimulate
NMR Imaging and Localized Spectroscopy
NIBIB

Multifunctional image analysis tool

Varian FID N/A N/A
SWIFT
NMR Imaging and Localized Spectroscopy
NIBIB

Sweep imaging with Fourier Transform sequences are available for use at other institutions by MTA agreement with CMRR.

Vnmrj 3.2 N/A N/A