Biomedical Technology Resources
Collaboration Through Dissemination
Visit Website Back

Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Technology at Stanford

Gary H. Glover, Ph.D.
P41EB015891
Active

Center Overview

The Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Technology develops innovative technologies in five core research areas of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI/MRS):

  1. image reconstruction, fast imaging and radiofrequency (RF) pulse design methods,
  2. R hardware development,
  3. body imaging methods,
  4. neuroimaging methods, and (5) MR spectroscopy methods.

In each of these areas, we capitalize on the long-standing, successful partnership and extensive experience in Stanford's Radiology and Electrical Engineering departments to improve and expand imaging technology for use in basic research and clinical care, and to provide cutting edge opportunities to the extramural community for biomedical research with MRI.

Over its more than 18 years of existence, CAMRT has been motivated by and has served a wide base of extramurally sponsored collaborators and service users from leading medical and research institutions. Examples of collaborative projects are the development of real-time functional MRI biofeedback methods for neuroscience and clinical applications such as pain remediation, development of methods to mitigate metal artifacts in musculoskeletal imaging, development of novel RF pulses for many applications, and studies of breast cancer with efficient MRS methods.

Impact on Human Health

Historically, the development and introduction of new magentic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI/MRS) methods has had a profound impact on public health research and clinical care. However, vendors of magnetic resonance instruments introduce new technology into their products based on marketing and other factors (such as FDA regulatory issues) that often preclude the timely availability of cutting edge research capabilities for investigators performing basic or clinical studies using MRI/MRS. As a result, there is a compelling need for providing advanced technology in many basic areas of magnetic resonance physics. By making such methods available to the NIH community, many studies can be enabled that would otherwise require duplicative effort or would not be performed at all due to lack of expertise or tools for the development. CAMRT has collaborations with many national and international programs, including the Function BIRN multi-site study of schizophrenia, in which CAMRT's PI acted as chair of the Calibration/Acquisition Working Group, and the Center contributed both expertise and hardware/software to the consortium. The Center has also been part of the ADNI Imaging Core, and members serve on advisory boards for numerous other imaging studies as well as for several other Biomedical Technology Research Centers.

Resources

ResourceDescriptionSupported PlatformsSupported FormatsData TypeData Size (compressed)
Dcm2gen
Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Technology at Stanford
NIBIB

This software converts from DICOM to GE Genesis 5.x image file format (MR images only).

N/A N/A
Diffusion Tensor Image Post-Processing
Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Technology at Stanford
NIBIB

Post-processing routines for reconstruction of diffusion tensor images. Precompiled binaries for Unix/Linux are available. Please send email to Mike Moseley (mike@lucas.stanford.edu) stating your name and research institute. Instructions for downloading this software package will be sent to you. For more details, visit http://rsl.stanford.edu/moseley/tensorcalc

N/A N/A
Gehdr2matlab
Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Technology at Stanford
NIBIB

Convert rdbm.h and imagedb.h into a Matlab script for reading/writing GE raw data headers.

N/A N/A
Lxgrab
Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Technology at Stanford
NIBIB

Take a snapshot of a GE console screen. Download PERL script.

N/A N/A
RF Pulse Design
Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Technology at Stanford
NIBIB

A library of Matlab routines developed by John Pauly (pauly@mrsrl.stanford.edu) for designing RF pulses using the Shinnar-Le Roux algorithm. Reference: Pauly J, Le Roux P, Nishimra D, Macovski A. Parameter relations for the Shinnar-Le Roux selective excitation pulse design algorithm. IEEE Tr Medical Imaging 1991; 10(1):53-65. Also available is the dualband RF pulse described in: Schricker AA, Pauly JM, Kurhanewicz J, Swanson MG, Vigneron DB. Dualband spectral-spatial RF pulses for prostate MR spectroscopic imaging....

Matlab N/A N/A
Spiral MRI Pulse Sequence
Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Technology at Stanford
NIBIB

An MRI pulse sequence with spiral read-out gradients and image reconstruction code. The sequence is written in GE's EPIC pulse programming environment and is available in precompiled format for 5.x and LX platforms. The reconstruction software is precompiled C code. You need to have a GE research agreement to be able to run the sequence on your scanner. To obtain this package, please send email to Gary Glover (gary@lucas.stanford.edu) stating your name, research institute,...

N/A N/A
Tools for GE MR Data
Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Technology at Stanford
NIBIB

Software developed by Marcus Alley (mtalley@stanford.edu). These are all binary programs (so you might have to make them executable after download) that run from a command window.

N/A N/A